2013 STMA Conference Recordings
Conference Rebroadcasts
2013 Premium Content
Collapse Full 2013 STMA Conference

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 16, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
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Collapse 2013 STMA Conference Keynote Address
 Humanitarian, Business Leader, Award Winning Philanthropist; these are some of the words that are often used when referring to Ian Hill.  Whether running a multi-million dollar business operation with more than 1,000 employees, or spearheading first of their kind life-changing community projects, Ian Hill has been recognized for being a catalyst for positive change throughout the Globe.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 16, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE 2013 STMA Conference Keynote Address
Collapse STMA 102 - Making Plant Growth Regulators Work for You
Summary Paragraph: 
The first part of this presentation will cover how plant growth regulators (PGRs) work and the differences between various PGRs. Their use specific to sports turf on both cool and warm season grasses will be discussed including effects on surface stability (divoting), traffic tolerance, rooting, and tiller development. Other uses such as mixing PGRs with turf marking paint and Poa annua suppression will also be discussed. Sports turf managers will benefit by gaining an understanding of how PGRs work, which will help them select the PGR that is right for their field. Additionally, they will learn how PGRs can improve the playability of their field.

After attending this session, the participant will be able to:
  1. Understand how PGRs affect turf growth and subsequently select the proper PGR for their situation.
  2. Determine if a PGR program will benefit their field through increased surface stability and other surface characteristics.
  3. Understand how other field maintenance practices are affected and/or influenced while on a PGR application program.

Who Should Attend:
  • Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew
  • Students
  • Stadium and Facility Managers
  • Coaches and Athletic Directors
  • Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields
  • School Business Officials
  • Public Works Managers
  • Physical Plant Administrators
  • Directors of Parks and Recreation
  • Suppliers to the Industry
  • Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 16, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 102 - Making Plant Growth Regulators Work for You
Collapse STMA 108 - Athletic Field Use and Maintenance Planning
  Summary Paragraph: 
Three documents will be shown as examples of how to manage owner and user expectations on athletic fields.  The Parks Maintenance Plan will show maps of parks color coded into levels of turf maintenance, inspection checklists, and other useful tools for managers.  The Field Maintenance Manual uses pictures to guide volunteer organizations on how-to maintain skinned infields and turf fields.  And the Field Use Policy is the document that governs field users.  I will compare and contrast examples of lenient and very strict policies and highlight their pros/cons.  The Field Use Policy discussion leads into the last section of the presentation on actual field use numbers.  I will show baseball, soccer, lacrosse, and football field pictures from the 2011 and 2012 seasons and correlate their condition to the number of events that occurred. 

Learning objectives:   
  1. The value of creating plans, policies, and manuals that can be manager's tools to communicate with athletic field owners and users.
  2. When creating or amending a Field Use Policy, the pros and cons of certain rules, restrictions, and penalties.
  3. My case study of field conditions versus the number of scheduled events for natural grass athletic fields will give managers a benchmark to compare their field use and maintenance plan against.

Who Should Attend:
  • Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew
  • Students
  • Stadium and Facility Managers
  • Coaches and Athletic Directors
  • Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields
  • School Business Officials
  • Public Works Managers
  • Physical Plant Administrators
  • Directors of Parks and Recreation
  • Suppliers to the Industry
  • Others Involved with Sports Field Management
Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 16, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 108 - Athletic Field Use and Maintenance Planning
Collapse STMA 112 - 3 Keys To Providing High Quality, High Traffic Athletic Fields
 Summary Paragraph: 
Maintaining high traffic athletic fields to a high quality is a growing challenge for Sports Field Managers around the world.  The need for increased revenues and the demand from users is igniting a new era of increased use of athletic fields.  To meet those demands, Sports Turf Managers must get creative to find ways to provide a high quality playing field at all times.  

The Maryland SoccerPlex is placed under those high traffic yet high quality demands almost year round, playing host to over 6,000 events across 22-fields.  In this presentation, SoccerPlex Director of Grounds Jerad Minnick will discuss in-depth the 3 keys to the program the SoccerPlex Grounds team has developed over the last 4 years to ensure their fields are always presented at the highest standard. It will provide real world experiences and living examples of how SoccerPlex has increased play from 400 hours to over 700 hours per season.  The presentation will challenge some of the traditional thoughts for maintaining athletic fields and provide new insights on how to maintain high traffic fields to an increasingly high standard.  


Attendees will:
  1. Observe how important the most basic of cultural practices can be for a field placed under the demands of high traffic.
  2. View nutrient management and plant growth in a new light, understanding that vigorous growth is detrimental for high traffic fields.
  3. Create ideas in reference to "managing traffic" as part of managing a field and conclude that grass fields really can sustain heavy traffic and remain in high quality.

Who Should Attend:
  • Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew
  • Students
  • Stadium and Facility Managers
  • Coaches and Athletic Directors
  • Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields
  • School Business Officials
  • Public Works Managers
  • Physical Plant Administrators
  • Directors of Parks and Recreation
  • Suppliers to the Industry
  • Others Involved with Sports Field Management
 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 16, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 112 - 3 Keys To Providing High Quality, High Traffic Athletic Fields
Collapse STMA 121 - Back to Basics: Getting the Most from Your Granular Fertilizers
 Summary Paragraph: 
Although more than 78% of the air we breathe is nitrogen gas (N2), turfgrasses are unable to capture it from the atmosphere. For this reason, fertilizer manufacturers spend considerable time, effort and money every year developing granular N-containing fertilizers for sports turfs. Some of these are homogenous, with granules having an equal amount of nutrition. Others are blends of several nutrient sources or carriers. Depending on how it is formulated, a fertilizer may release N very quickly or for an extended period of time. Since energy is required to convert atmospheric nitrogen to ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-), the forms that turfgrasses use, the cost of fertilizers increases as energy and fuel costs rise. 

Getting the most out of a turf manager’s fertilizer budget is the goal for this seminar. Attendees will learn the factors that affect how nitrogen is released, how long it is available after application and the physical properties of a fertilizer which help sports turf managers make informed decisions when purchasing and applying granular fertilizers. Attendees will evaluate the physical qualities of fertilizers and make buying decisions based on their evaluations. Turf managers will come away from this seminar able to ask specific questions about nutrient release, fertilizer size, particle distribution and uniformity, and particle flight.  

After attending this session, the participant will:
  1. Better understand the chemical and physical characteristics of fertilizer carriers.
  2. Learn the nutrient release characteristics and residual availability of fertilizers.
  3. Be able to employ informed analysis when making fertilizer purchases and applications.
  4. Learn how long N is available to turf after a specific nitrogen source is applied.
  5. Learn what factors affect how nitrogen is released.
  6. Learn two physical properties (size guide number and uniformity index) of granular fertilizers to consider when purchasing N fertilizers.

Who Should Attend:
  • Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew
  • Students
  • Stadium and Facility Managers
  • Coaches and Athletic Directors
  • Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields
  • School Business Officials
  • Public Works Managers
  • Physical Plant Administrators
  • Directors of Parks and Recreation
  • Suppliers to the Industry
  • Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming, Live Webcast
Original Seminar Date: January 16, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 121 - Back to Basics: Getting the Most from Your Granular Fertilizers
Collapse STMA 201 - New Strategies for Annual Bluegrass Control in Cool-Season Turfgrass
 Annual bluegrass control on cool-season sports fields is difficult. This topic has been covered in detail in previous STMA annual meeting presentations. Mesotrione (Trade name: Tenacity) is a recently labeled herbicide with efficacy against annual bluegrass. However, as presented in previous STMA seminars, annual bluegrass control with mesotrione requires many applications and can be inconsistent. Research has been conducted in 2011 and 2012 at The University of Tennessee and Purdue University to improve mesotrione efficacy against annual bluegrass. Research projects include over 10 field, greenhouse, and growth chamber experiments to evaluate the effects of synergistic tank-mix partners and cultural practices on the herbicidal efficacy of mesotrione against annual bluegrass. The goal of these efforts is to provide new strategies for annual bluegrass control that require fewer herbicide applications than before. How results of these experiments apply to sports field managers will be discussed. Strategies developed from this research have been communicated to sports field managers and used with success. This presentation will discuss the influence of nitrogen fertilization and application timing on mesotrione efficacy. It will also introduce amicarbazone (Trade name: Xonerate) as a newly labeled product for annual bluegrass control. Research conducted at The University of Tennessee and Purdue University has determined tank-mixtures of mesotrione and amicarbazone to be synergistic and capable of providing excellent annual bluegrass control.

Presentation Outline:

-Briefly introduce annual bluegrass biology and explain why it is a problematic weed of cool-season turfgrass athletic fields.

-Discuss disadvantages of older options for control. This includes pre-emergent herbicides that are ineffective because annual bluegrass germination is difficult to predict. Post-emergent herbicides such as ethofumesate (Trade name: Prograss) can inhibit spring greenup of Kentucky bluegrass. Growth regulators such as Trimmit require many applications.

-Discuss strategies presented previously for controlling annual bluegrass with mesotrione. These strategies require 3 or more applications and control can be inconsistent.

-Greenhouse and growth chamber experiments investigating the effects of nitrogen fertilizer application and temperature on mesotrione efficacy against annual bluegrass. Findings from these experiments and how they apply to sports field managers will be discussed.

-Introduce amicarbazone (Xonerate) as a newly labeled product for control of annual bluegrass.

-Briefly explain how amicarbazone’s mode-of-action complements that of mesotrione and discuss this as it relates to herbicide synergy.

-Discuss results of 2011 and 2012 field trials evaluating mesotrione-amicarbazone tank-mixtures in Tennessee and Indiana. Tolerance of perennial ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass to these combinations was also evaluated and will be discussed.  Excellent control of annual bluegrass was achieved with single applications of mesotrione + amicarbazone. Results of 6 field trials will be condensed.

-Share results of sports field managers who have used strategies developed from this research to control annual bluegrass on their cool-season athletic fields.

-Leave time for questions

 

After attending this session the participant will be able to:

1) Implement strategies for annual bluegrass control

2) Understand the advantages and disadvantages of using mesotrione for annual bluegrass control

3) Understand how nitrogen fertilization and environmental conditions affect mesotrione efficacy

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

 

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 201 - New Strategies for Annual Bluegrass Control in Cool-Season Turfgrass
Collapse STMA 204 - Strategies for Maintaining Turfgrass in Response to
 Turfgrass managers in Connecticut struggle to re-define turf management techniques as they adapt to recent legislation.  As many sports turf managers face similar challenges and mandates, strategies for consideration in a “no pesticide” program are critical.  This presentation will discuss turfgrass management without the use of conventional pesticides and focus attention to details that support success before mandates limit key management tools.  Discussion points include attention to field health, record keeping, and scouting as practices that are integral components to success.  Important cultural practices such as mowing, fertilization, aeration, irrigation, topdressing, and overseeding will be highlighted and discussed.

 

Attendees will:

Understand the benefit of detailed record keeping in a “no pesticide” management strategy.

Understand the value of sound cultural practices that benefit field health and player safety.

Understand the value of pro-active attention to mandates or policy that affect field health strategies and the job requirements of the sports turf manager.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 204 - Strategies for Maintaining Turfgrass in Response to
Collapse STMA 205 - Applying MLB Practices to Low Budget Facilities
 We are going to cover fertilization practices, repairing wear areas, using/making tools and material usage for mound, clay and INF.

We are going to give a fertilizer outline on a budget, making the most of your fertilizer.

Repairing wear areas without the use of sod

Using high priced tools, i.e. nail drag, slope board, without paying the high price.

Selecting the proper materials for mound/clay and INF mix.

 

Attendees will learn:

1) To be able to provide a management plan and fertilizer techniques to enhance your turf for the same amount of money.

2) How to utilize everyday use products with great benefits by adjusting the makeup of materials.

3) How to use higher priced tools without spending a high price.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 205 - Applying MLB Practices to Low Budget Facilities
Collapse STMA 206 - Fertility Management for Sand-based Systems
 The presentation will include some basic information on the soil chemistry of sand-based sports fields and will include a discussion on how to manage these areas most effectively.

 

The learning outcomes are:

1) to provide an expanded knowledge of soil chemistry.

2) to relate those basic concepts to sand-based soil media.

3) to expand the knowledge of the attendee on ways of managing sand-based sports fields.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 206 - Fertility Management for Sand-based Systems
Collapse STMA 207 - Building it Right...for all the Right Reasons
 This presentation covers the entire construction process of 16 acres of state-of-the-art sand based sportsfields; from breaking new ground through germination (and all steps in between). The sportsfields are located directly adjacent to a natural wetland on previously undeveloped land.

With wetlands, birds, plants, animals and their habitat as our immediate neighbors, extensive planning, care and attention went in to all issues that might negatively affect this environmental gem. A few examples of  issues closely considered were; dewatering the proposed sportsfield site and redirecting the water effectively back to the wetlands, pre and post construction drainage, environmental monitoring, water conservation (central control irrigation and watering by ET), water quality and ensuring the marsh had no net loss of good water in it during and upon completion of construction. 


The session attendee will:

1) Understand the many reasons why a sportsfield sand specification is required and will be given an example of one.

2) Learn ideas on how to be proactive in sportsfield construction near an ESA.

3) See how to build and work alongside nature responsibly all the while building a high end sand-based sportsfield....and much more.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 207 - Building it Right...for all the Right Reasons
Collapse STMA 208 - New Challenges, Take Risks, and Achieve Goals
 In life there will be opportunities to take on new challenges, take risks, and achieve goals.  Also, in life you will hopefully have opportunities to work with people that you respect and admire for their own individual skill sets.  This talk will walk through how two CSFM’s came together with a common goal and how they are achieving it together.  The talk will highlight goal setting, working constantly to improve your fields and facilities, risk and reward choices in your career, and mentoring.  Our hope is to show how two people can work towards a common goal with different responsibilities and have great success.

 

Attendees will learn:

1. The importance of setting goals and achieving those goals – and just maybe – changing goals in mid-stream.

2. The importance of mentoring – where would any of us be without great mentors!  Sometimes they fall in our lap and sometimes we seek them out to help us achieve set goals.

3. Communication is a day to day activity.  Openness and honesty are very important.  This presentation will instill that good communication happens well beyond the boundaries of shops or offices.  Respect, acknowledgement and common goals lead to a relaxed and energized environment which promotes healthy communication.   

4. The importance of challenging yourself, maintaining energy and working constantly to grow; whether it be through institutional knowledge or field practices.  Discussion of risk and reward – a lot of times people are afraid to make a change or don’t know how to handle increased responsibilities.  Many times we fear change or don’t embrace it.  This presentation will show how two managers taking a leap of faith has provided benefit to their university, to them personally and professionally and to the image of the Sports Turf Management profession.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 208 - New Challenges, Take Risks, and Achieve Goals
Collapse STMA 212 - Communication and the Art of Conflict Resolution
 Good communication skills are vital to successful interpersonal interactions, both in the professional and personal world.  A useful working knowledge of communication skills leads to enhanced performance and greater success.  The ability to utilize communication skills to successfully resolve conflict is also a useful tool for the effective manager.  This presentation will introduce communication and conflict resolution skills that the participant can immediately utilize to increase their professional efficacy and enhance their personal relationships.

 

Attendees will learn:

To identify communication facilitation skills to increase the potential for effective communication.

To identify communication stoppers to avoid engaging in these behaviors.

To be able to utilize skills to more successfully resolve conflict situations leading to a more effective outcome.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 212 - Communication and the Art of Conflict Resolution
Collapse STMA 215 - Phosphorus: Environmental Issues
 This talk will cover the environmental impact of phosphorus and the issues surrounding P fertilization for turfgrass.

 

Attendees will:

1.  Understand the basic behavior of P in the soil, and what can happen when that P is overapplied to turfgrass.

2.  Learn about new and pending P regulations and how those may affect fertilizer application, by state.

3.  Learn about current research in the fate of fertilizer.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 215 - Phosphorus: Environmental Issues
Collapse STMA 216 - K-16 Baseball Field Maintenance & Renovation With Limited Resources
 We all want to get the most out of what we put into taking care of our ballparks.  But, we are facing the worst financial crisis in our history. And our leaders struggle with budget shortfalls and its impact.  Many people use ballparks day after day, see the problems, but really don’t have any idea where to start to fix it. From K-12, to park and rec, to high school and collegiate, many coaches, parents, and maintenance staff just don’t know where to start or what to do. It can be overwhelming.

 

There is a solution. Armed with a couple tools, you can evaluate your ball park, prioritize improvement efforts, create an action plan you can really implement, and keep your ballpark in tip top shape into the future.  This presentation is for baseball field maintenance staff, both professional sports turf managers and community volunteers, who don’t have the resources and staff that premium quality fields have, but want a ball field they can be proud of.  The session will include tips/hints and mistakes to avoid using over two dozen case study examples from K-12, high school, park and rec, and collegiate.

 

Presentation Outline:

This briefing starts by describing the need every year: volunteers, turn over, inherit a mess, little budget, interest but maybe not any experience, politics, attract and retain youth players, embarrassing fields, injuries, not sure what to do, weather, vandalism, equipment failures.

 

1. Introduction, session description and objectives, a little about the presenter, why people involved with schools, youth leagues, and park and rec need this information.

 

2. Getting started. Evaluating your ballpark and identifying priorities for improving safety and playability: using a pre-season audit checklist, turf and infield skin basics, use of diagrams and field layouts.  Impact of multi use fields and multi tenant complexities as well as single organization use ball fields.  Case studies as examples: several little league, college, park and rec, high school.

 

3. Creating a specific action plan for your improvements including tools, equipment, products and supplies, budget, schedule, and labor.  Maintenance goofs and field failures to avoid - Lessons learned so these don’t happen to you also.  Case studies as examples: several little league, high school, and park and rec ball fields.

 

4. Implementing renovation projects and an ongoing maintenance program – basic components, funding, getting board members, athletic directors, or park officials on board, frequently asked questions, and then cycling through the entire process again.  Specific examples of success in getting support and funding.  Case studies and examples of what worked and did not work.

 

5. Making sure success isn’t dependent entirely on you alone.  Be a hero, but also ensure you develop a team effort to prevent burnout.  Getting teams, the community, and organization leadership involved and committed to ongoing success and development of field maintainers.

 

After attending this session, the participant will be able to:

1. Evaluate your ballpark and identify priorities for improving safety and playability.

2. Create a specific action plan for your improvements including tools, supplies, budget, schedule, and labor.

3. Layout a program for ongoing care – basic steps, frequency, and then cycling through the entire process again.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 17, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 216 - K-16 Baseball Field Maintenance & Renovation With Limited Resources
Collapse STMA 300 - Tackling the Issues with Synthetic Turf: What Does the Research Say?
 This presentation will highlight findings from independent research on a number of issues related to synthetic turf such as surface temperature, injury rate, environmental safety, and playability characteristics.  As the popularity of synthetic turf continues to grow, field managers are commonly asked questions on a wide variety of topics, some of which they may not be well versed in such as the effects of synthetic turf on the environment.  This presentation will focus on those issues and provide field managers with a knowledge base backed by research on a wide variety of topics related to common concerns associated with synthetic turf.  

 

Attendee Takeaways:

After attending this session, the participant will be able to:

1. Communicate facts about hot-button issues related to synthetic turf to administrators, parents, etc.

2. Adjust field maintenance procedures related to anti-bacterial treatment applications and understand the effectiveness of surface cooling techniques

3. Understand why surface testing such as Gmax testing is important and how to interpret test results.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 300 - Tackling the Issues with Synthetic Turf: What Does the Research Say?
Collapse STMA 301 - New Options for Weed Control in Athletic Field Turf
 Session Outline:

I. Introduction - Why weeds are present

II. What is properly managed turf?

     A. Cultivar selection

     B. Mowing height and frequency

     C. Fertilization timing and amount

     D. Irrigation timing and amount

III. Issues faced by athletic field managers

     A. Agronomic problems

     B. People problems

IV. Preemergence Herbicides

     A. Target weed species

     B. Application techniques and timings

     C. DNA herbicides - rooting concerns/traffic tolerance

     D. New chemistries

     E. Overseeding safety

V. Postemergence Herbicides

     A. New chemistries/experimentals - target weed species

     B. Turfgrass tolerance and overseeding concerns

     C. Difficult to control weeds

          1. purple nutsedge

          2. dallisgrass

          3. goosegrass/crabgrass

          4. khakiweed

 

Participants will:

1. Understand the importance of spray application techniques as it pertains to preemergence herbicide efficacy for the control of weeds.

2. Know the proper/safe use and limitations of current preemergence herbicides for weed control on overseeded and non-overseeded athletic field turf.

3. Understand the use of new and emerging herbicides for the postemergence control of weeds in athletic field turf.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 301 - New Options for Weed Control in Athletic Field Turf
Collapse STMA 303 – Water Management to Improve Turf Performance
 Effective water management is among the most important cultural practices at the sports turf manager’s disposal.  In this seminar, we’ll discuss the basics of turf water use; methods for determining irrigation requirements; plant growth response to irrigation frequency; and the impact of irrigation on turf responses to stresses.


Attendees will learn:

The importance of effective irrigation for maintaining a quality field.

How to determine optimum irrigation amounts and frequencies.

Plant growth response to irrigation and its effect on other stresses.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 303 – Water Management to Improve Turf Performance
Collapse STMA 307 - Maintaining Sports Fields the Natural Way
 Sports field managers have been under pressure to consider or transform their management practices to a more natural program.  The catalyst for this is the increased public perception that pesticides should not be used on their son's or daughter's playing field.  We are often asked how to control a particular pest and in the short run we can usually provide an answer.  Sports field managers first need to ask why a particular pest exists.  Perhaps that pest is there for a reason and pests are often indicators that something is needed or needs to be changed in the management practice of that field.  Once management practices are adjusted, then we can incorporate some of the natural products available for additional pest control.  Natural turfgrass management is a program approach of cultural practices and natural products.  So we will discuss the pest indicators and how cultural practices affect our potential for various pests.  Then provide information on a number of natural products to round out the discussion.

 

Attendees will:

1 - Understand why pests exist and what are indicator pests.

2 - Know how to change up cultural practices to reduce pest potential.

3 – Understand what natural products are available as alternatives to pesticides.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

 

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 307 - Maintaining Sports Fields the Natural Way
Collapse STMA 310 - Tale of Two Fields: Synthetic vs. Natural
  With over 6000 synthetic surfaces installed in North America over the past decade many of us will be faced with replacing a synthetic surface in the coming years.  Will you choose to keep a synthetic surface?  Revert back to a natural grass surface?  How much money is involved?  How much cash is on hand? 

Currently 16 cities in the US are under Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection, with major cities like Detroit, LA and New York undergoing massive re-structuring to avoid going bankrupt.  It is not just cities; there are a staggering number of school districts who are going bankrupt across the nation.  When faced with funding classrooms or replacing fields, where will the priorities to spend precious funding lie?

This 20/20 hindsight review will detail the decision-making process used by the community, city staff, and city council to select surfaces used in two City parks: one a natural grass surface and the other a synthetic surface. Learn from their cost benefit analysis, health benefit analysis, pros/cons of each type of surface, political agendas that were involved, and other aspects of the selection process. Also learn about the unexpected benefits/ consequences, current maintenance practices compared to typical “recommended” practices and how each surface has held up over the past 5 years. The presentation will conclude with the city’s wish list for “next time” and what the future holds for the two surfaces in Glendale.

 

Learning Objectives:

First, Turf managers rarely get to make the final decision regarding the type of playing surfaces.  Learn who the key individuals are in the decision making process and how to work with these key individuals.

Next, attendees will develop a good understanding of the public’s concerns with regards to the selection of playing surfaces.

Finally, attendees will have a better understanding of the true costs of synthetic turf ownership.


Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 310 - Tale of Two Fields: Synthetic vs. Natural
Collapse STMA 312 - Converting from Cool Season to Warm Season Grass
 The presentation will discuss the research, reasoning, and replacement of two Kentucky Bluegrass / ryegrass natural grass football fields to Patriot bermudagrass.  The talk will discuss the 6 years of planning to see this project come to completion.

 

The three take away points will be:

1) Is our facility able to support Bermudagrass.

2) The cost savings of using Bermudagrass.

3) The planning it took to make the change over.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 312 - Converting from Cool Season to Warm Season Grass
Collapse STMA 404 - Common Diseases of Sports Turf
 The presentation will cover guidelines and methods to identify common diseases of sports turf, as well as current strategies to manage turfgrass diseases.

 

Attendees will:

1. Identify the symptoms and signs of common diseases of sports turf.

2. Understand the relationship between weather/environment and turf disease severity.

3. Develop cultural practices and strategies to manage turfgrass diseases in sports turf.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 404 - Common Diseases of Sports Turf
Collapse STMA 406 - Turf Equipment Care and Maintenance
 This presentation will cover the many important aspects of Turf Equipment Care and Maintenance, which technicians can use to ensure that their equipment provides them with the longest and most productive service life. Information covered will include the importance of maintenance, general maintenance guidelines, and information to make maintaining equipment quick and efficient.  Machine systems covered include, engines, hydraulics, electrical systems, and cutting units.

 

Attendees will:

1. Develop an understanding of the importance of equipment maintenance and how maintenance or the lack of maintenance affects machine life and performance.

2. Gain an understanding of proper maintenance procedures and processes.

3. Learn what effects maintenance or the lack of maintenance can ultimately have on the turf.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 406 - Turf Equipment Care and Maintenance
Collapse STMA 408 - Managing Turfgrass Soil Physical Properties

This presentation will explore the difference in management practices and approaches when managing a native soil sports field versus a high-sand sports field rootzone. Practices for both rootzones will be discussed. Often, the biggest mistakes are made when a sports field manager takes a practice designed for one type of rootzone and applies it to the other. A review of common misapplication of techniques will be discussed in detail. This workshop should be attended by any sports field manager who is working to improve the air/water relationship in their rootzone. Common misapplication of drainage concepts as it relates to soil physical properties will also be covered.

 

Attendees will:

1. Understand management strategies associated with soil compaction, drainage, and surface stability for long term success.

2. Understand how to navigate the sometimes confusing array of techniques available to improve soil physical properties.

3. Learn how to make sound economical decisions on which techniques truly benefit their soil and which ones they may be able to do without.

 

Who Should Attend:

·         Sports Turf Managers, Assistants, and Crew

·         Students

·         Stadium and Facility Managers

·         Coaches and Athletic Directors

·         Architects, Engineers, and Builders of Athletic Fields

·         School Business Officials

·         Public Works Managers

·         Physical Plant Administrators

·         Directors of Parks and Recreation

·         Suppliers to the Industry

·         Others Involved with Sports Field Management

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: January 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
PURCHASEPURCHASE STMA 408 - Managing Turfgrass Soil Physical Properties